Canadian Threshold at GP Ghent 2012 – Top 32

So this tournament report might be slightly outdated. But it’s also not. I wanted to write this immediately after the GP, but I was too busy at the time. There are two reasons I’m writing this now. The first is Kai Sawatari. I jokingly told him I might write this report several weeks ago. He’s been bringing it up every other time we’ve spoken since then. The second reason is also Kai Sawatari. I have not yet had the opportunity to test the Storm vs. Eldrazi Stompy matchup in a satisfying manner and I was looking for a deck to play in a local Legacy tournament. Kai and I had been talking about Canadian Threshold, and he actually played the deck recently. I asked him to give me his list, and when the maindeck was one card off of my GP Ghent maindeck (replacing a dualland with another fetch), I was already excited. I borrowed the deck on Magic Online, took it for a test drive and came to this conclusion:

I’ve been playing it a lot more again, and I think it’s a relevant deck again, so I want to talk about the list. Telling its origin story simply feels right, plus GP Ghent is one of my fondest memories of playing Magic. To tell the story of GP Ghent right though, we first have to walk down memory lane a bit further, to the Bazaar of Moxen 2012 tournament.

Two weeks before the Bazaar, Avacyn Restored came out, and with it the Miracle mechanic. I was fully intent on playing Miracles at all Legacy events at the Bazaar. The evening before the first Legacy tournament, we went to some friends’ hotel to tech out our decks. While I was still working on my Miracles deck, some of us started playing Vintage. I also wanted to play, but somehow didn’t feel like playing Miracles. So I grabbed the first deck I could find, which was Carsten Linden’s Canadian Threshold. I hadn’t played the deck in more than six months, but it felt right. Even before we finished our play session, I checked if I had all the cards for the deck. I did, and I decided to play it the next day. I ended up going 10-0.

This was the list Carsten gave me:

CanadianBazaar

Things that stood out from other lists at the time were the lack of the fourth Tarmogoyf and the use of Magma Spray. Carsten had been playing the deck forever and came to the conclusion that Tarmogoyf was just not that great, and eleven creatures were plenty. Magma Spray was a concession to Dredge and Nic Fit being popular.

From picking up the deck at the Bazaar to the main event at GP Ghent two months later, I ended up playing 61 tournament matches with it, trying out a multitude of things, and drawing several conclusions:

–11 creatures were too many, but 10 were not enough

–Magma Spray wasn’t the best removal spell, it should be Forked Bolt or Fire // Ice

–as with the creatures, 7 removal spells were too many, but 6 were not enough

–at one tournament, a friend pointed out how unfair some of the deck’s starts were and mentioned how the presence of hard draw spells would push the deck even further

–Grafdigger’s Cage was much more effective against graveyard decks than Tormod’s Crypt was, while also having other applications

–the deck wanted a way to destroy artifacts

–the deck did not want a way to destroy Counterbalance – if it resolved, you were losing anyway

–four copies of Spell Snare were a lot, especially when you frequently faced decks like Sneak & Show or Dredge, which had zero targets

–countermagic was the best way to interact with anything

–sometimes you wanted to counter removal spells in later stages of the game, which Spell Pierce and Flusterstorm couldn’t do reliably

I’m fairly sure that I learned more about the deck from playing it, and Carsten experience was a great resource. There were also several play-style oriented conclusions, but the above were most important in shaping the list I played at GP Ghent:

CanadianGhent

What stands out the most is probably the even lower number of Tarmogoyfs. We just never liked the card all that much in any matchups and Sylvan Library easily made up for the decreased creature count. It was another threat against control decks, only it was much better at running away with games; the same was true for Show and Tell matchups, where with the same risk, Tarmogoyf’s upside was just much lower than Sylvan Library’s. Libary was the source of card advantage that pushed the deck into unfair territory in some matchups, while also providing the filtering that negated the need for the 11th creature and 7th removal spell.

Counterspell is a card that I’m personally known for playing in Delver decks by now, but that never really caught on. The main criticism brought up towards Counterspell is its casting cost, but it’s not like this list has a higher curve than any other list – we were already down to two Tarmogoyfs and didn’t play Snapcaster Mage nor Vendilion Clique, which see way more play than Counterspell with much lower power levels. Having that extra hard counter in the end game goes a long way, and I especially like it against Miracles, where they do their best to cast their spells through all your soft counters, only to end up running into Counterspell. It was also very relevant against GW Maverick by countering non-creature spells like Swords to Plowshares and Green Sun’s Zenith without the inflexibilities of Spell Pierce or Flusterstorm (only working early, not dealing with creatures).

The rest is hardly worth talking about. The countermagic is slightly more refined in general, Grafdigger’s Cage replaced Tormod’s Crypt by virtue of simply being better, and due to the emergence of Esper Stoneblade, a copy of Ancient Grudge found its way into the sideboard, at the cost of the second Mind Harness, which didn’t hurt much since I only wanted to board five cards against GW Maverick anyway.

Before we get to the actual tournament report, a short aside on fetchlands: You always want to play the fetches that signal Stifle the least. Flooded Strand is usually the best primary choice because it evokes Miracles; Polluted Delta is second best because it doesn’t signal any deck in specific; Scalding Tarn and Misty Rainforest are mostly associated with Delver decks and thus Stifle. Wooded Foothils simply screams Threshold – no deck with Wooded Foothills keeps hands without turn one plays. For smaller tournaments, this order can be influenced by other decks you play. When I play locally, I tend to go with Polluted Delta and Misy Rainforest, because I’m known for playing Storm. Had I shown Miracles more, I’d be on Flooded Strand and Scalding Tarn.

With that out of the way, the tournament report:

Round One: Bye

I played a total of seven GPTs for GP Ghent, but failed to win any of them. At least I managed to rack up enough Planeswalker Points for one bye…

Round Two: Mercier, Francois – MUD

When my round two opponent played a Cavern of Souls on turn one, I did not expect him to name Golem, but that’s exactly what he did. I managed to counter two of his lock pieces and Bolt a Lodestone Golem in game one, which was enough to win on the back of an early Delver that thankfully managed to transform in time.

In game two, my opponent showed me an uncounterable Wurmcoil Engine, but I was fortunate enough to have drawn Ancient Grudge, which allowed me to win the damage race regardless. Not the most eventful match, but definitely a confidence booster, especially concerning the last-minute addition of Ancient Grudge, which I discussed with Carsten at the morning of day one and he didn’t end up playing.

-1 Stifle
-1 Forked Bolt

+1 Ancient Grudge
+1 Spell Pierce

2-0 // 2-0

Round Three: de Goeijen, Gijs – Esper Stoneblade

I honestly don’t remember much from this match. Only that my opponent had a Batterskull on the battlefield for three turns in one game and still lost and that my aggressive use of Sylvan Library’s ability to draw additional cards paid off by finding Ancient Grudge in my last possible draw to kill his Batterskull in our last game.

I’m fairly sure that last game was game three, but I don’t remember losing a game in this match.

-1 Dismember
-4 Stifle

+1 Grafdigger’s Cage (play)
+1 Ancient Grudge
+2 Pyroblast / Flusterstorm
+1 Spell Pierce
+1 Surgical Extraction (draw)

(This sideboarding might be slightly off, it’s been a while.)

2-1 // 3-0

Round Four: Zhang, Siyuan – Sneak & Show

Siyuan and I used to play at the same stores, travelling to multiple events together, including GP Amsterdam in 2011. He beat me in the top eight of the GPT he won, so playing him after his byes was a bit poetic.

I expected him to be on Sneak & Show, but he could have been on MUD as well; both were decks he played frequently at the time. I don’t remember much, but I think I survived an Emrakul attack in one game by stifling Annihilator and killing him on the back swing. This is the match I remember the least about.

-2 Tarmogoyf
-1 Dismember
-3 Spell Snare
-1 Forked Bolt

+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+1 Spell Pierce
+1 Surgical Extraction

2-0 // 4-0

Round Five: Henderyckx, Camstra – OmniTell

At this point, I felt fairly comfortable with my deck, and I was relieved about this matchup – it’s not easy, but it’s pretty good if you know what you’re doing. It’s noteworthy that OmniTell at this point in time still had creatures (two copies each of Emrakul and Griselbrand, usually) and was playing Burning Wish, which turned on our Spell Snares.

We split the first two games, with me countering all of his spells and blowing up all of his lands in one and him being able to go off properly in the other. The more exciting game was game three, where he managed to resolve Show and Tell for Omniscience, but only had a Ponder left to cast. He went on to cast two more cantrips without finding anything, so I won.

-2 Tarmogoyf
-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Dismember
-1 Spell Snare
-1 Forked Bolt

+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+1 Spell Pierce

2-1 // 5-0

At this point, I felt pretty good, having gotten insanely lucky twice so far (finding Grudge against my Esper opponent in my last draw Round Three and not dying in Round Five). I was not very happy about my pairing for round six, however, as I had to play against yet another friend:

Round Six: Kihl, Mads – Canadian Threshold

Of course, the upside of playing a friend is that I had the opportunity to ask Mads about our match while writing this. He says we had a good, interactive game one and I manascrewed him game two, which sounds about right.

-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Counterspell
-4 Daze (draw)
-1 Force of Will (play)
-1 Spell Pierce
-3 Spell Snare (play)
-1 Forked Bolt

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+2 Submerge

2-0 // 6-0

Round Seven: Estratti, Samuele – Canadian Threshold

I’m not gonna lie, I have never been as nervous playing Magic as I was during this match. Samuele had won PT Philadelphia the previous year and made top sixteen again at the next Pro Tour, PT Dark Ascension. I was playing in my third GP, only the second one I tested for. I did not feel like a favourite to win this match, and this was my first time playing for day two at a Grand Prix.

I won the first game on the back of my superior list  we had Spell Snares whereas Samuele was on the full set of Spell Pierce and familiarity with the matchup. It wasn’t very close. Game two, he rode the play advantage all the way.

Game three was very close and had a few interesting moments. On turn two, I wasted Samuele’s land, which he let resolve, so I put him on not having Stifle. However, the next turn, he had a Stifle for my fetch – the Wasteland was actually good for him, because he apparently had a land-heavy draw.

At one point, Samuele wasted one of my fetches when I had three more lands and a Tarmogoyf or Delver out. I put him on Submerge and let the Wasteland resolve; he went on to cast Submerge in combat. In the last turn, it came to a situation where I was very far ahead on board, but he could still win if his three cards were Lightning Bolt and two other removal spells – he cast a Ponder, shuffled, cast another Ponder, shuffled again. I won.

After winning this match, I felt invincible.

-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Counterspell
-4 Daze (draw)
-1 Force of Will (play)
-1 Spell Pierce
-3 Spell Snare (play)
-1 Forked Bolt

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+2 Submerge

2-1 // 7-0

Round Eight: Siron, Geoffrey – Belcher

I didn’t know it at the time, but I later learned that Geoffrey had also won a Pro Tour before (London, 2005).

Game one was pretty interesting, especially considering he was on Belcher. He managed to resolve a Charbelcher, but never got to activate it. Well, he did, but I countered the activations with Stifles and burned him out with Forked Bolt plus Lightning Bolt after an Insect had done good work on his life total.

Game two was the most intricate game I have seen involving Belcher. I had a Force in my opening hand, but expecting him to have access to Pyroblasts, I figured that wasn’t enough. So I never tapped below one land. Here’s the catch though: I didn’t find a second land. I discarded to hand size at least five times, not willing to cast cantrips nor creatures in my turn, only casting a pair of Brainstorms in his end steps. At some point he went off via Empty the Warrens, which induced a very long judge call about how it interacted with Flusterstorm, which he wasn’t familiar with.

-2 Tarmogoyf
-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Dismember
-1 Forked Bolt

+2 Flusterstorm
+1 Spell Pierce
+2 Rough // Tumble

2-0 // 8-0

Round Nine: Menten, Robbert – GW Maverick

In this round, I had the fake feature match – we played in the feature match area, but didn’t even receive text coverage. Which was quite unfortunate, because I think our match was pretty cool.

I won the roll and led with Flooded Strand game one. He played and activated a Misty Rainforest on his turn, which led me to believe we were playing the mirror, but I couldn’t confirm that because I had Stifle and he never showed me what his fetch would have gotten. On my turn two, I cast Sylvan Library, which resolved. On his turn two, he finally showed his true colours, with Savannah into Mother of Runes. I drew two additional cards with Library, Forked Bolted his creature, wasted his land, and played a Delver. He played a Forest and Green Sun’s Zenith for Dryad Arbor on turn three, I went to my turn, drew at least another additional card, transformed my Delver and killed his creature. The game was over quickly, and I don’t remember seeing someone receive a harder beating from Canadian Threshold ever.

Game two I had two early Delvers, but Robbert managed to stabilise on six life. I had Library again, but I was dead on board, so I shrugged and sent both of my Insects in against his Maze of Ith, Scryb Ranger and tapped Linvala, Keeper of Silence. He thought he had the game wrapped up and simply blocked one Insect with his Scryb Ranger, using Maze for my second Aberration. Unfortunately for him, I had Stifle for his Maze and Bolt for his face.

-4 Daze
-1 Spell Pierce

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Submerge
+2 Rough // Tumble

2-0 // 9-0

Round Ten: Ohlrogge, Christoph – Esper Stoneblade

I didn’t feel very good in the beginning of day two because I was quite nervous about the tournament and woke up at around five in the morning. It didn’t help that I had another fake feature match with several spectators.

I lost the roll and played Delver on turn one, which was answered by a Stoneforge Mystic on Christoph’s turn two that I couldn’t counter. On my turn, I flipped Delver with Daze. Great start to the day. At least I had Lightning Bolt for his Mystic. He had a third land and another Mystic on his next turn, which also resolved. I drew Spell Snare on my turn. I quickly lost to his Batterskull from there, already being far behind on cards.

Game two was more of the same. I kept a very strong hand without green mana but one or two copies of Nimble Mongoose. I managed to counter all of his relevant spells, but never found a green source despite casting two copies of Ponder and a Brainstorm, dying with four green creatures in hand. I guess that was retribution for winning round five against all odds.

-1 Dismember
-4 Stifle

+1 Grafdigger’s Cage (play)
+1 Ancient Grudge
+2 Pyroblast / Flusterstorm
+1 Spell Pierce
+1 Surgical Extraction (draw)

(This sideboarding might be slightly off, it’s been a while.)

0-2 // 9-1

Round Eleven: Maurer, Lukas – Elves

One thing I should mention here is that before the printing of Deathrite Shaman, Elves was a mono-coloured deck, so I had a lot of dead cards in the matchup – both Wasteland and Stifle were virtually dead cards, which also made Daze a lot worse. If you look at Lukas’ decklist, you will see eleven basic lands, no fetches.

Needless to say, this match was about as lopsided as my round nine match against Maverick. I pretty much did nothing game one and lost to an early Meekstone I couldn’t handle in game two. I guess you can’t always draw your one-off Grudge.

-1 Sylvan Library
-4 Daze
-1 Dismember
-4 Stifle

+2 Grafdigger’s Cage
+1 Ancient Grudge
+2 Flusterstorm
+1 Spell Pierce
+2 Submerge
+2 Rough // Tumble

(I might have kept some number of Dazes and shaved Wastelands instead, but Wasteland at least pretends to answer Gaea’s Cradle and casts some of my sideboard cards.)

0-2 // 9-2

Round Twelve: Kandri, Thibault – Sneak & Show

This match was not very eventful, as I easily countered all of my opponent’s relevant spells while beating down in both games, but I think it’s interesting to note that he was playing Gitaxian Probe in place of Intuition, an unusual choice at the time, even though it’s much more common nowadays. Intuition out of Show and Tell decks was part of the reason we had a miser’s Surgical Extraction in our sideboard.

-2 Tarmogoyf
-1 Dismember
-3 Spell Snare
-1 Forked Bolt

+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+1 Spell Pierce
+1 Surgical Extraction

2-0 // 10-2

Round Thirteen: Light, Matthew – GW Maverick

This was another one of the matches where my opponent first thought they had a deck-advantage, but then went on to get completely and utterly destroyed (which is, by the way, something Matt said when we later played at GP Paris in 2014).

In game one, Matt had a turn one Mother of Runes off Cavern of Souls, which I bolted, then he had a Thalia to my Delver and we wasted each other out of casting any more spells. Naturally, I was ahead in the race, and when he drew enough lands to start casting spells again, I had already drawn a land myself to pay for Daze and Force of Will through his Thalia, locking up the game.

In game two, he made the mistake of casting a Knight of the Reliquary, which ended up locking him out of the game thanks to my miser’s Mind Harness. Can’t say the card is not good at what it does.

-4 Daze
-1 Spell Pierce

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Submerge
+2 Rough // Tumble

2-0 // 11-2

Round Fourteen: Enevoldsen, Thomas – Death & Taxes

The closest match of Magic I have played in my life. We split the first two games, each of our decks doing its thing once. Game three went back and forth as we were in a race where I killed a lot of creatures, but Thomas stalled the ground with Mother of Runes and reset my Delvers with Flickerwisps. In the end Thomas won on one life, attacking me for exactsies. All of the lands I drew were fetchlands, but I also think all of my Delvers transformed immediately. I wish I had a recording of this game to see where things could have gone differently.

-4 Stifle

+1 Ancient Grudge
+1 Spell Pierce
+2 Rough // Tumble

1-2 // 11-3

Round Fifteen: Teppa, Michaele – Canadian Threshold

I don’t remember much here. We split the first two games; I think I lost game one by drawing Library which is not exactly great in the mirror and won the second game on the back of superior boarding plans. In game three I mulled to four in search of lands and easily lost, inducing slight amounts of tilt.

-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Counterspell
-4 Daze (draw)
-1 Force of Will (play)
-1 Spell Pierce
-3 Spell Snare (play)
-1 Forked Bolt

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+2 Submerge

1-2 // 11-4

Round Sixteen: Kopec, Mateusz – Canadian Threshold

So in game one, I was on the play and cast a Brainstorm on my opponent’s turn two, putting two copies of Nimble Mongoose back on top of my library. Looking at my hand and my opponent’s board, I considered the game wrapped up – he didn’t have any board presence and I was about to start beating with Threshold soon. I went to my turn, untapped, drew and cast a Nimble Mongoose and passed the turn. Before he even untapped his lands, I looked at my hand and saw a copy of Nimble Mongoose which should not have been there. I told him to pause for a moment, counted cards in my graveyard, hand and board, and immediately called for a judge when I came to the conclusion that I had an extra card somehow.

I explained the situation to the judge, who issued a game loss. I thought the situation could easily be fixed because I didn’t shuffle between casting Brainstorm and my draw step, so I appealed to the head judge. The head judge also issued a game loss and said that the situation could have been fixed had I not activated a fetchland to cast the Nimble Mongoose, which I still don’t understand, to be honest. Either way, I was down 0-1 due to somehow physically messing up (I have no clue how the second Mongoose ended up in my hand, maybe I didn’t put it back, maybe the cards stuck together, maybe I was just clumsy), so I was even more on tilt than after round fifteen.

Of course, that was until I completely thrashed my opponent in both postboard games to finish in 24th place, which was slightly disappointing after my 9-0 start, but a decent result overall. It was also great to see Timo make top eight and win the entire tournament, even though he didn’t play optimally in the finals.

-1 Sylvan Library
-1 Counterspell
-4 Daze (draw)
-1 Force of Will (play)
-1 Spell Pierce
-3 Spell Snare (play)
-1 Forked Bolt

+1 Mind Harness
+2 Flusterstorm
+3 Pyroblast
+2 Submerge

2-1 // 12-4

After the tournament, I was very happy with the list. The only cards that didn’t shine were the pieces of graveyard hate, but that was simply because there were so few graveyard decks in the tournament relative to their general presence in the metagame at that time.

The graveyard hate is also what I wouldn’t play right now, because there are barely any graveyard decks left in the metagame, and with Elves having terrible mana now, Grafdigger’s Cage isn’t needed as badly against them anymore. Mind Harness has also lost a lot of value, so it should be replaced with another removal spell.

But overall, what the deck is doing is still good. Canadian Threshold is so refined and efficient that it’s hard for the deck to become really bad. It might not be great against Abrupt Decay / Deathrite Shaman / Cascade decks, but there are many ways to customise the deck to react to metagame trends. I am going to write a follow-up on current Canadian Threshold within the next two weeks, but so long, here’s the list Kai gave me when I asked him for a deck to play in an MKM Series Trial:

Canadian

Thanks for reading.

J

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Canadian Threshold at GP Ghent 2012 – Top 32

    1. I’ve never liked Loam all that much in Canadian.Clearly it has very high upside, but I haven’t found it to be consistent enough. When you don’t have any Wastelands it’s very bad, and when you have only one, it’s not great either. There are few matchup where you want to draw Sinkhole repeatedly. It’s very good with two or more Wastelands though.
      I think Winter Orb does the same thing better in most matchups, especially how well it works against Miracles and other decks with many basics and/or high land counts. Winter Orb is very good against Lands for example, whereas Loam + Wastelands won’t be able to keep up most of the time.

  1. It wins the delver mirrors often (vs BUG, RUG, UWR, UBR) you don’t really need to have wasteland, although with so much deck manipulation you’re likely to find them, just making sure you’re not the one getting mana screwed is great because so many of these “mirror” games are decided that way.
    It is also good against grindy strategies like Pox, some BG and BW versions, lands, aggro loam, 12-post, Mud, Eldrazi (nowadays). I just always like having access to one in the sideboard.

    1. I actually think it’s a trap in the Delver mirror. Yes, it can be absurdly good, but usually the game plays out on the board. Mana screw is not the point of Wasteland, Stifle and Daze – it’s all about tempo advantages, i.e. taking the lead and then riding it to victory.
      Further, by the time you can resolve Loam, I’d say you’re firmly in the “not manascrewed” stage. I’d almost always rather cast a creature than Life from the Loam at any stage in a Delver mirror.

      Loam is certainly a nice resource to have against decks like Pox, but do they even exist? I don’t care about metagaming against them.

      Against 12Post, Loam is likely more effective than Winter Orb, but against most Loam strategies and decks with Sol lands, I greatly prefer Winter Orb. Not repeatedly spending mana on your mana denial cards makes a huge difference.

  2. Wow, sweet memory from 4 years ago! Was indeed surprised to get paired with you on round 4. I only won last time because your deck had 0 Daze. Too bad I have left the tournament scene (read: you guys) when Deathrite Shaman came out to slaughter the threshold.

    1. Yeah, I remember much more from our GPT match than the GP one. You kept 5 lands, Show and Tell & Griselbrand, I countered the turn two Show and Tell, then you drew Sneak Attack and killed me, because I didn’t have any more counters. Felt terrible haha

  3. Sweet report, thanks! I was also to Ghent in 2012 and played RUG Delver as well, finishing less impressive at somewhere around 120th. I have a few questions regarding your decklist and sideboarding:

    1. Sylvan Library in the mirror: The card is underwhelming in maindeck games, a fact which is underlined if you’re on the draw. In the sideboard games, however, I’ve noticed that the games tend to go to a midrangier direction since it is increasingly difficult to stick creatures through all the removal in the match. In my experience, the card has been better than good, if not excellent in these games. Is losing card advantage and/or tapping 2 on your own turn for something that has no immediate impact too much to cover for the upside? Have cantrips done enough to find your threats in the mirror? Would you keep the Library in against other Delver variants such as Grixis or BUG?

    2. Cutting Stifles against Death and Taxes: I would not personally touch the Stifles even if the said D&T would be monocoloured. The card has numerous targets, many of which are almost usually very good (SFM trigger, Batterskull trigger, Wasteland) and some are situational (Vial activation, MoR activation, Flickerwisp trigger). Again, from my own experience, Daze is terrible on the draw against a deck with a) troublesome 1-drops b) a relatively denial resilient manabase c) a well-curved game plan that punishes early Dazes d) occasional copies of Cavern of Souls.
    On the play I have usually cut some Force of Wills and Spell Pierces (I have played 3 MD), since Dazes and the remaining FoW:s would appear to be enough to help me maintain the game tempo.

    Cutting Stifles on the play could be the way to go, since the necessity for reactive gameplays is far less than on the draw. However, I would like to know if you would earnestly advocate for keeping Dazes in while on the draw.

    3. Submerges: What matchups are there that you would board all 3 in? Maverick, mirror and BUG Delver spring to mind, but I’m not exactly sure. If these are the targets for the card, is using 20 % of the sideboard space justified?

    Once again, thanks for the report and for your thoughts beforehand.

    Cheers,

    -Kake

    1. Hey, thanks for your feedback!

      1) Regarding Sylvan Library, maybe you’re right that it’s better in postboard mirror games. The reason I always thought the card was good was because you could draw additional cards. If you don’t get to do that, you’re left with a clunky Mirri’s Guile, which is already a bad card. This is also the reason why I like it against Sneak & Show but not against Storm.

      I tend to keep Library against Team America, but board it out against all Delver variants with Lightning Bolt.

      2) My main goal against Death & Taxes has usually been to keep Vial off the table. All these Vial deck (D&T, Merfolk, Goblins) are built to abuse the mana advantage they get from Vial – Merfolk gets to flood the board more quickly and attack with creature lands, Death & Taxes gets to use their lands for manadenial and Goblins get to do both. That is why I always keep all copies of Daze, at least on the play. Not only do you get the opportunity to interact with their Vial more often, you also get additional cards to counter their creatures when they don’t have it. Because all of these decks actually have very ambitious mana bases, considering how much mana they’re looking to spend in an average game.

      Most of the things Stifle does against Death & Taxes are repair work – Stifle Batterskull when you couldn’t counter or kill Stoneforge Mystic, interact with Mother of Runes when you couldn’t otherwise, you get the drift. I’m willing to lose games where these things happen if that means I get better at preventing them from happening. After all, we are the aggro deck in that matchup anyway. Might as well embrace that role.

      3. I board Submerge against anything with Tarmogoyf, Infect, Elves and Maverick. Pretty sure that’s justified, although Kai has been trying a second Dismember in place of the third Submerge, something I want to try out as well.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s